Lez Get Historical

Posts tagged lgbt

493 notes &

butch-in-progress:

It isn’t in the Water, it’s in the Seed
[K] Let me introduce you to A Florida Enchantment - a film produced in 1914 which isn’t only one of the earliest depictions of homosexuality on the silver screen, but also the earliest one to settle the question about the origin of homosexuality once and for all… unfortunately, no one remembers. And no, it’s not music videos. Here’s how it works:
The film’s protagonist pops a magical seed which causes some gender confusion, a.k.a her transformation into a glorious butch, as she starts dancing with and hitting on girls, donning a suit and being all around better at being ‘male’ than all those guys around her, which makes her fiancee decide to also try the seed on himself.
Mayhem (and entertainment) ensues.
You can watch the 3.30 minute condensation of the film here, or purchase the whole thing here.

butch-in-progress:

It isn’t in the Water, it’s in the Seed

[K] Let me introduce you to A Florida Enchantment - a film produced in 1914 which isn’t only one of the earliest depictions of homosexuality on the silver screen, but also the earliest one to settle the question about the origin of homosexuality once and for all… unfortunately, no one remembers. And no, it’s not music videos. Here’s how it works:

The film’s protagonist pops a magical seed which causes some gender confusion, a.k.a her transformation into a glorious butch, as she starts dancing with and hitting on girls, donning a suit and being all around better at being ‘male’ than all those guys around her, which makes her fiancee decide to also try the seed on himself.

Mayhem (and entertainment) ensues.

You can watch the 3.30 minute condensation of the film here, or purchase the whole thing here.

Filed under Hollywood silent film film vintage lesbian drag cross-dressing lgbt gay

13 notes &

Stonewall Uprising

Great Stonewall lesson but, if I remember correctly, only features one woman.

After you’ve watched Stonewall Uprising, you must see Out in America. Unfortunately, I can only find the preview. If you know where to watch the full doc, please let me know so I can update the link.

From PBS:

Out in America is an uplifting collection of unique, transformative stories and inspiring personal narratives told through the lens of the country’s most prominent LGBT figures and pioneers, as well as many average, yet extraordinary, citizens from Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender communities.

They forgot to add, “The Harolds will melt your heart.”

Also interesting: Kate Clinton on her involvement with the program.

(Source: imaafool)

Filed under lgbtq lgbt stonewall pbs out in america kate clinton

6 notes &

Familial homophobia: Interview with Sarah Schulman

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

(via The Lesbrary)

Can’t wait to read this.

Do you think the straight press ignoring your book is a form of homophobia in itself?

They want to believe their supremacy is natural or neutral or just the way things are and any kind of analysis that says that it’s imposed by force or constructed is something they are not prepared to confront. So they want it to be that any time we are considered is that what they call tolerant is their benevolence and you can see that consistently if you analyse what gay materials are allowed through and which ones are not.

One review in British lesbian magazine Diva mentioned the book had a whiff of victim about it. What do you think about that?

I wrote to [editor] Jane [Czyzselska] and she acknowledges that things are very different in Britain. I’m not saying homophobia in the family is different, but in Britain openly lesbian novelists with lesbian protagonists are accepted as real human beings who actually write real books, so people like Jeanette Winterson and Sarah Waters are treated like people: they are nominated for prizes, their books are considered by mainstream venues, they are on television and when you go there as an American you get that treatment too.

When I have books published in Britain I’m in The Guardian and all this type of thing too. But here in the US there is not a single openly lesbian novelist with lesbian protagonists who is treated like an American. So we are in a really different position.

The British books are imported. Interestingly there was a very fascinating biography of Patricia Highsmith that was published here and Jeanette Winterson was invited by the New York Times to review it – no American lesbian was invited to do it. So in Britain there’s more representation.

There is a line in the book where you say ‘The weak need help’ when you are referring to gay people who are scapegoated. There’s a sense then that we are ‘victims’ but doesn’t that play into stereotypes about gay people being weak and victims, so it’s kind of a catch 22 situation?

Well I think gay people are victimised by familial homophobia and there’s no reason not to say so. I think it has enormous impact on people’s lives so why pretend otherwise?

Filed under Sarah Schulman familial homophobia lgbt lgbtq

253 notes &

elliottmarshal:

“Annie On My Mind” By Nancy Garden 

This groundbreaking book, first published in 1982, is the story of two teenage girls whose friendship blossoms into love and who, despite pressures from family and school that threaten their relationship, promise to be true to each other and their feelings. Of the author and the book, the Margaret A. Edwards Award committee said, “Nancy Garden has the distinction of being the first author for young adults to create a lesbian love story with a positive ending. Using a fluid, readable style, Garden opens a window through which readers can find courage to be true to themselves.” The 25th Anniversary Edition features a full-length interview with the author by Kathleen T. Horning, Director of the Cooperative Children s Book Center. Ms. Garden answers such revealing questions as how she knew she was gay, why she wrote the book, censorship, and the book s impact on readers - then and now.

elliottmarshal:

“Annie On My Mind” By Nancy Garden 

This groundbreaking book, first published in 1982, is the story of two teenage girls whose friendship blossoms into love and who, despite pressures from family and school that threaten their relationship, promise to be true to each other and their feelings. 

Of the author and the book, the Margaret A. Edwards Award committee said, “Nancy Garden has the distinction of being the first author for young adults to create a lesbian love story with a positive ending. Using a fluid, readable style, Garden opens a window through which readers can find courage to be true to themselves.” 

The 25th Anniversary Edition features a full-length interview with the author by Kathleen T. Horning, Director of the Cooperative Children s Book Center. Ms. Garden answers such revealing questions as how she knew she was gay, why she wrote the book, censorship, and the book s impact on readers - then and now.

(Source: cureelliott, via fuckyeahlesbianliterature)

Filed under annie on my mind nancy garden lgbt

10 notes &

AfterEllen: Mary Oliver discusses her poetry, her late partner and being happier than ever at 75

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Mary Oliver appears in this month’s O Magazine, which features poetry and journaling as part of the creative process. As a huge fan (and subscriber) of the mag, I was thrilled to see the interview with Oliver, who is an out lesbian as well as one of the world’s most renowned writers about nature and life.

Oprah writes in her opening column that Maria Shriver had asked her to interview Mary for years, but Oprah thought Maria should do it, and she did. The famed TV journalist (and politician’s wife) visited Mary at her home in Provincetown, Massachusetts where they discussed her life, her writing and how it has changed since the passing of her longtime partner, Molly Malone Cook, who died of cancer in 2005.

An excerpt from the interview:

Maria Shriver: You have lived a very unique life, a life really individual and fearless.
Mary Oliver:
Well, it was never a temptation to be swayed from what I wanted to do and how I wanted to live. Even when Molly got ill, I knew what to do. They wanted to take her off to a nursing home, and I said, “Absolutely not.” I took her home. That kind of thing is not easy. I used to go out at night with a flashlight and sit on a little bench right outside the house to scribble poems, because I was too busy taking care of her during the day to walk in the woods.

Maria Shriver: You had a 40-year relationship with Molly. How did her death change your life?
Mary Oliver:
I was very, very lonely.

Maria Shriver: You’ve written in your work that you rarely spent any time apart. How did you avoid being crushed by losing her?
Mary Oliver:
I had decided I would do one of two things when she died. I would buy a little cabin in the woods, and go inside with all my books and shut the door. Or I would unlock all the doors — we had always kept them locked; Molly liked that sense of safety — and see who I could meet in the world. And that’s what I did. I haven’t locked the door for five years. I have wonderful new friends. And I have more time to be by myself. It was a very steadfast, loving relationship, but often there is a dominant partner, and I was very quiet for 40 years, just happy doing my work. I’m different now.

Read More

Filed under afterellen mary oliver o magazine maria shriver lgbt lgbtq glbtq

54 notes &

wtfhellokitty:

downlo:

libraryland:

literarylovers:

Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas and pigeons.


Is this Piazza San Marco? It seems the armed gangs of pigeons that brazenly terrorize tourists there have been allowed to rule the square for longer than I’d thought.

Ick, fat flying rats.  Hope they’re feeding them pot brownies.  Looks like St. Mark’s Square.

Gertrude & Alice in Piazza San Marco, Venice, 1908

wtfhellokitty:

downlo:

libraryland:

literarylovers:

Gertrude Stein, Alice B. Toklas and pigeons.

Is this Piazza San Marco? It seems the armed gangs of pigeons that brazenly terrorize tourists there have been allowed to rule the square for longer than I’d thought.

Ick, fat flying rats.  Hope they’re feeding them pot brownies.  Looks like St. Mark’s Square.

Gertrude & Alice in Piazza San Marco, Venice, 1908

Filed under gertrude stein alice b toklas venice lgbt lgbtq

151 notes &

Ms. Blog: My Favorite Feminist: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

In honor of Women’s History Month, I want to honor my favorite (and too-little-known) feminist, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, a 17th century nun, poet and scholar.

Juana was born in 1648 in San Miguel Nepantla, Mexico, near Mexico City. She was officially registered as “a daughter of the Church” because her parents were unmarried. At the age of three, she followed an older sister to school and convinced a teacher to show her how to read. Juana taught herself all she could by reading her grandfather’s library and soon mastered logic, Latin and the Aztec language Nahuatl. She asked to be allowed to disguise herself as a man so that she could go to university, but was not given permission and had to continue to tutor herself. In a somewhat dramatic teenage display of commitment to her education, Juana cut off her hair every time she made a mistake in Latin.

In her mid-teens, Juana was sent to live with her aunt in Mexico City; by then, rumors of her prodigious intellect had spread to the capital and she was presented at the court of a new viceregal couple, Antonio Sebastian de Toledo (the Marquis de Mancera) and Leonor Carreto. They were so impressed with Juana that they invited theologians, jurists, philosophers and scholars to meet with her and conduct a question-and-answer test of her intellect. Juana surprised everyone with her impressive performance against the scholars and Leonor accepted Juana as a maid-in-waiting in her court. During her time in court, Juana was a bit of an intellectual celebrity and began to write poetry, often for celebratory occasions.

At 20, Juana entered the Convent of the Order of St. Jerome, which was then the only avenue through which she could continue her education (she even turned down several marriage proposals in order to continue focusing on her learning). There, she amassed a library of over 4,000 volumes, wrote poetry, carols and plays that were published and widely read, corresponded with nobles, held intellectual court and taught music and drama. Much of Sor Juana’s poetry is romantic and there is evidence to suggest that she was involved with the Countess de Pareda, one of her many benefactors.

Trouble began for Sor (Sister) Juana once her patronage from nobility waned. In 1690, Sor Juana critiqued a famous sermon given by Antonio de Vieira. The Bishop of Mexico, pretending to be impressed by her, asked Sor Juana to put her critique in writing. Without her knowledge, the Bishop published the critique under the pen name “Sor Filotea de la Cruz” and included a letter condemning her intellectualism as a woman. In a brave act of defiance, Sor Juana responded by publishing her most famous text, “Reply to Sor Filotea.” In it, Sor Juana defended the intellectual rights of women and the rights of women to have access to education, and condemned the Church for helping to keep women uneducated. Sor Juana explained the ways in which she believed education could be used to serve God and recounted her own life-long struggle to pursue education in a society that did not believe women should be learned. For daring to stand up to the patriarchal and misogynist policies of the Church, Sor Juana was officially censured. She was no longer allowed to publish her work, reading her work was prohibited by the Church and she was forced to give away her library of books. She died in the convent in 1695.

In his 1988 book Sor Juana: Or, The Traps of Faith Nobel Prize-winning author Octavio Paz rediscovered and contextualized Sor Juana’s texts for a new generation, since part they had been mostly forgotten. Paz praised Sor Juana’s poetry and writings and even declared her a “universal poet.” In 1990, a powerful dramatic film was made about Sor Juana’s life, “I, the Worst of All,” which takes its title from an apology Sor Juana was forced to write to the Chuch. Sor Juana is now featured on Mexico’s 200 peso note and the former site of the Convent of the Order of St. Jerome, Sor Juana’s convent, is now the University of the Cloister of Sor Juana. I wrote a paper about Sor Juana in college and I’m still in awe of her fearless commitment to intellectual rights for women, her refusal to live a typical life and her unending determination to be educated in a time when women didn’t often have the chance to be.

Image of Sor Juana via Wikimedia Commons.

UPDATE: A link to some of her poetry, in both Spanish & English

Filed under sor juana ines de la cruz ms magazine ms blog lgbt lgbtq

1,417 notes &

feminist slut: HISTORY BLOGS!

fywomenshistory:

http://rarelyinhistory.tumblr.com/ | Rarely in History
http://fywomenshistory.tumblr.com/ | Women’s History
http://awesomeshitwomendid.tumblr.com/ | Women’s History
http://fuckyeahhistorycrushes.tumblr.com/ | History Crushes
http://lezgethistorical.tumblr.com/ | Lez get Historical
http://fuckyeahapihistory.tumblr.com/ | Asian/Pacific Islander History
http://fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory.tumblr.com/ | Latin American History 
http://18thcenturyhistory.com/ | 18th Century History 
http://effyeaharthistory.tumblr.com/ | Art History
http://blackvintage.tumblr.com | Black Vintage (African American History)
http://vintagelesbian.tumblr.com/ | Vintage Lesbian 
http://19thcentury.tumblr.com/ | 19th Century History 
http://artsoftherenaissance.tumblr.com/ | Renaissance Art 
http://mediumaevum.tumblr.com/ | Medieval/Middle Ages 
http://defterisk.tumblr.com/ | Art history
http://fuckyeahwomenartists.tumblr.com/ | Women Artist (historical/present) 
http://eurohist.tumblr.com/ | Euro History 
http://todayinwomenshistory.com/ | Today in Women’s history 
http://vivelareine.tumblr.com/ | Marie-Antoinette 
http://superseventies.tumblr.com/ | The 70’s 
http://fuckyeahvictorians.tumblr.com/ | FY Victorians
http://aboutegypt.tumblr.com/ | Ancient Egypt
http://fuckyeahgypsyroselee.tumblr.com/ | Gypsy Rose Lee 
http://thatswhatshesaidquotes.tumblr.com/ | Women’s Quotes
http://historyofeurope.tumblr.com/ | Euro history 
http://fuckyeahmalcolmx.tumblr.com/ | Malcolm X 
http://turnofthecentury.tumblr.com/ | Turn of the Century 
http://fyeahqueervintage.tumblr.com/  | Queer Vintage
http://18thcenturyfashion.tumblr.com/ | 18th century fashion.
http://ancient-time.tumblr.com/ | Images from ancient history.
http://axis-sally.tumblr.com/ | WWII history.
http://back-then.tumblr.com/ | Images from history.
http://backtotheussr.tumblr.com/ | USSR history.
http://bythegods.tumblr.com/ | Mythology.
http://considerthepast.tumblr.com/ | Images from history.
http://deadpresidents.tumblr.com/ | American president history.
http://demons.swallowthesky.org/ | War history [personal favorite].
http://fuckyeahancienthistory.tumblr.com/ | Ancient history.
http://fuckyeahhistoricalfacts.tumblr.com/ | Historical facts.
http://fyeahhistorymajorheraldicbeast.tumblr.com/ | History major meme.
http://greatestgeneration.tumblr.com/ | WWII history.
http://heckyeahperiodpieces.tumblr.com/ | Images of period films.
http://historythings.tumblr.com/ | General history and humor.
http://musichistory.tumblr.com/ | Music history.
http://romanovs.tumblr.com/ | Images of the Romanovs.
http://sovietstuff.tumblr.com/ | Soviet History.
http://thefirstwaltz.tumblr.com/ | Images from history.
http://theurbanhistorian.tumblr.com/ | Urban history.
http://yeoldefashion.tumblr.com/ | Fashion history.
http://yeoldenews.tumblr.com/ | Historical newspapers.

If I am missing any blogs, message me. I will add them to the list. 

yes. YES! See you in a few weeks, world. I’m off to Tumbl through history!

(Source: , via lipsredasroses)

Filed under history lgbt lgbtq