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Posts tagged natalie barney

19 notes &

feminist slut: Eileen Grey -Architect of the Day

feministslut:

Eileen Grey was an an Irish furniture designer and architect and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture.

Biography:

Eileen Gray was born on 9 August 1878 into an aristocratic family near Enniscorthy, a market town in south-eastern Ireland. Gray…

glbtq encyclopedia:

  Around 1922, Gray became lovers with Marisa Damia (1892-1978), a popular singer who encouraged her to bob her hair and wear tailored suits. Why they separated is unknown; however, Damia became Gabrielle Bloch’s lover after Loie Fuller’s death in 1928.

In 1926, after seeing the first exhibition of photographs by Berenice Abbott (1898-1991), a lesbian who had recently established her own Paris studio, Gray commissioned a portrait of herself. Abbott produced several memorable images, including a crisp, tailored profile.

Ooooo Did Berenice take the photo above perhaps?

Although bisexual, Gray was ultimately more interested in work than in passionate attachments. Her most abiding friendships were with lesbians, especially Kate Weatherby (ca 1881-1964) and Evelyn Wyld.

Gray was acquainted with expatriate writers Natalie Clifford Barney and Gertrude Stein and the women who frequented their salons, but preferred the company of one of Barney’s lovers, painter Romaine Brooks, who bought Gray’s rugs and was, perhaps, sympathetic to Gray’s reclusive nature.

Eileen Gray died October 31, 1976, and is buried in Père Lachaise Cemetery, Grave # 17606.

(via lipsredasroses)

Filed under eileen grey lgbt lgbtq berenice abbott kate weatherby evelyn wyld natalie barney romaine brooks

119 notes &

AfterEllen.com Huddle: The real life of celesbians

Courtney Gillette: Way before Janelle Monae made cute suits her signature, or Lady Gaga was flaunting her alter ego Jo Calderone, there was Gladys Bentley, flirting and singing the blues in men’s clothing during the heyday of the Harlem Renaissance.

Why no one has paid Betley homage with a proper documentary or biography is baffling to me. She wasn’t just into women (gossip columns were all a twitter when Bentley married a white woman in Atlantic City), she was an openly lesbian performer, who sang the blues not only at rent parties and speakeasies but at well known gay establishments. As for her style and preference for suits (and top hats! Homegirl rocks a top hat like nobody’s business!), she later told Ebony magazine, “It seems I was born different. At least, I always thought so….From the time I can remember anything, even as I was toddling, I never wanted a man to touch me…Soon I began to feel more comfortable in boys clothes than in dresses.”

The sad ending, though, came when Betley caved to the conservative pressures of the McCarthy era and “reformed,” marrying a dude, donning dresses, and saying she’d been cured. She also denounced her former ways as an effort to gain a mainstream audience, but that flopped. Gossip, style, blues, speakeasies, love affairs: Gladys Bentley’s life has the makings of some killer nonfiction. Who’s game?

The other ladies mentioned include Rachel Maddow, Sheryl Swoopes, Lily Tomlin, Natalie Barney, & Chantal Akerman.

Filed under gladys bentley natalie barney ma rainey rachel maddow sheryl swoopes lily tomlin afterellen

22 notes &

edwardianera:

Isadora Duncan.

Helllooooo, gorgeous.
glbtq encyclopedia:

Free  thinking, free spirited, free moving Isadora Duncan brought her  bohemian feminist consciousness to the dance stage and changed the art  of dance forever. Although some critics ridiculed her flowing,  expressive movements and her leftist politics, Duncan brought  flexibility and self-expression to the hidebound world of classical  dance.
Duncan  is known as the “mother of modern dance,” but even ballet was  influenced by the radical élan of her ideas. In many ways her life was  tragic, but she left behind, not a sense of despair and loss, but the  dynamic imagination of a true original.
[…]
Almost  as titillating as her radical approach to dance was Duncan’s bohemian  personal life. She was an outspoken socialist and advocate of women’s  rights who constantly challenged society’s rules. Claiming she did not  believe in marriage or monogamy, she had two children with two of her  many male lovers. (Both children were drowned in an accident in 1913.)
She  also attended Natalie Barney’s Paris salons and had female lovers,  among them writer Mercedes de Acosta, about whom she wrote, “My kisses  like a swarm of bees / Would find their way between thy knees / And suck  the honey from thy lips / Embracing thy too slender hips.”

Uh…yep. I’d like to hear more about this swarm of bees, hips, lips situation. Thank you.

(gif source: mrwhoisadoctor-)

edwardianera:

Isadora Duncan.

Helllooooo, gorgeous.

glbtq encyclopedia:

Free thinking, free spirited, free moving Isadora Duncan brought her bohemian feminist consciousness to the dance stage and changed the art of dance forever. Although some critics ridiculed her flowing, expressive movements and her leftist politics, Duncan brought flexibility and self-expression to the hidebound world of classical dance.

Duncan is known as the “mother of modern dance,” but even ballet was influenced by the radical élan of her ideas. In many ways her life was tragic, but she left behind, not a sense of despair and loss, but the dynamic imagination of a true original.

[…]

Almost as titillating as her radical approach to dance was Duncan’s bohemian personal life. She was an outspoken socialist and advocate of women’s rights who constantly challenged society’s rules. Claiming she did not believe in marriage or monogamy, she had two children with two of her many male lovers. (Both children were drowned in an accident in 1913.)

She also attended Natalie Barney’s Paris salons and had female lovers, among them writer Mercedes de Acosta, about whom she wrote, “My kisses like a swarm of bees / Would find their way between thy knees / And suck the honey from thy lips / Embracing thy too slender hips.”

Uh…yep. I’d like to hear more about this swarm of bees, hips, lips situation. Thank you.

(gif source: mrwhoisadoctor-)

Filed under isadora duncan modern dance mercedes de acosta natalie barney modern dance lgbt lgbtq

107 notes &

edwardianera:

fabulousandeccentric:

Liane de Pougy (2 July 1869 – 26 December 1950), was a Folies Bergères dancer renowned as one of Paris’s most beautiful and notorious courtesans.
Anne Marie Chassaigne was born in La Flèche, Sarthe, France, the daughter of Pierre Blaise Eugène Chassaigne and his wife Aimée Lopez, and raised in a nunnery. At the age of 16, she ran off with Armand Pourpe, a naval officer, marrying because she was pregnant. The baby was named Marco Pourpe, and his mother was, in her own opinion ‘a terrible mother’.
The marriage was not a happy one. Anne-Marie later wrote in her memoirs that her new husband took her violently on their wedding night, an event which left her emotionally scarred. It is said that the groom was a brute and abused her – she wore the scar of his beatings on her breast for the rest of her life. When Armand Pourpe’s naval career led him to a billet in Marseilles, Anne-Marie took a lover (the Marquis Charles de MacMahon). When her husband found them in bed together he shot her with a revolver, wounding her on the wrist. Deciding to leave her husband, Anne Marie sold the rosewood piano to a young man who paid 400 francs cash for the instrument. Within an hour, Anne Marie was on her way to Paris
She began her career as a courtesan with the Countess Valtesse de la Bigne, who taught Anne-Marie the profession and whose monumental bed was made of varnished bronze. Describing herself as vain but not a fool, Anne-Marie cultivated an interest in paintings, books and poetry, but avoided intellectual depth, which she considered dull. She preferred café-concerts and popular songs to Shakespeare or Wagner, and made minor appearances in the chorus of Folies-Bergere in Paris in St. Petersburg and cabaret clubs in Rome and the French Riviera. She was a conscientious bookkeeper.
Her lesbian affair with writer Natalie Clifford Barney is recorded in her novel Idylle Saphique, published around 1901. In 1899, after seeing de Pougy at a dance hall in Paris, Barney presented herself at de Pougy’s residence in a page costume and announced that she was a “page of love” sent by Sappho. Although de Pougy was one of the most famous women in France at the time, constantly sought after by wealthy and titled men, Barney’s audacity charmed and seduced her. The two were said to have had deep feelings for one another for the remainder of their lives.
Upon her marriage to Prince Georges Ghika in 1920 she became Princess Ghika; this marriage ended in separation, though not divorce. Her son’s death as an aviator in World War I turned her towards religion and she became a tertiary of the Order of Saint Dominic as Sister Anne-Mary. She became involved in the Asylum of Saint Agnes, devoted to the care of children with birth defects. Late in life she published a couple of light tales (L’Insaisissable and La Mauvaise part-Myrrhille). She died at Lausanne, Switzerland.
Credit

edwardianera:

fabulousandeccentric:

Liane de Pougy (2 July 1869 – 26 December 1950), was a Folies Bergères dancer renowned as one of Paris’s most beautiful and notorious courtesans.

Anne Marie Chassaigne was born in La Flèche, Sarthe, France, the daughter of Pierre Blaise Eugène Chassaigne and his wife Aimée Lopez, and raised in a nunnery. At the age of 16, she ran off with Armand Pourpe, a naval officer, marrying because she was pregnant. The baby was named Marco Pourpe, and his mother was, in her own opinion ‘a terrible mother’.

The marriage was not a happy one. Anne-Marie later wrote in her memoirs that her new husband took her violently on their wedding night, an event which left her emotionally scarred. It is said that the groom was a brute and abused her – she wore the scar of his beatings on her breast for the rest of her life. When Armand Pourpe’s naval career led him to a billet in Marseilles, Anne-Marie took a lover (the Marquis Charles de MacMahon). When her husband found them in bed together he shot her with a revolver, wounding her on the wrist. Deciding to leave her husband, Anne Marie sold the rosewood piano to a young man who paid 400 francs cash for the instrument. Within an hour, Anne Marie was on her way to Paris

She began her career as a courtesan with the Countess Valtesse de la Bigne, who taught Anne-Marie the profession and whose monumental bed was made of varnished bronze. Describing herself as vain but not a fool, Anne-Marie cultivated an interest in paintings, books and poetry, but avoided intellectual depth, which she considered dull. She preferred café-concerts and popular songs to Shakespeare or Wagner, and made minor appearances in the chorus of Folies-Bergere in Paris in St. Petersburg and cabaret clubs in Rome and the French Riviera. She was a conscientious bookkeeper.

Her lesbian affair with writer Natalie Clifford Barney is recorded in her novel Idylle Saphique, published around 1901. In 1899, after seeing de Pougy at a dance hall in Paris, Barney presented herself at de Pougy’s residence in a page costume and announced that she was a “page of love” sent by Sappho. Although de Pougy was one of the most famous women in France at the time, constantly sought after by wealthy and titled men, Barney’s audacity charmed and seduced her. The two were said to have had deep feelings for one another for the remainder of their lives.

Upon her marriage to Prince Georges Ghika in 1920 she became Princess Ghika; this marriage ended in separation, though not divorce. Her son’s death as an aviator in World War I turned her towards religion and she became a tertiary of the Order of Saint Dominic as Sister Anne-Mary. She became involved in the Asylum of Saint Agnes, devoted to the care of children with birth defects. Late in life she published a couple of light tales (L’Insaisissable and La Mauvaise part-Myrrhille). She died at Lausanne, Switzerland.

Credit

Filed under liane de pougy natalie barney lgbtq history lgbtq

157 notes &

edwardianera:

fabulousandeccentric:

Renée Vivien
Born Pauline Mary Tarn in Britain, Vivien moved to France at age 21 and changed her name.
Vivien lived lavishly and was openly lesbian. She traveled excessively all around the world, wintering in Egypt and spending time in China, the Middle East and America. Two of her well-known love affairs were with Natalie Clifford Barney and Baroness Hélène de Zuylen. Vivien was known to be beautiful and elegant before her illness. She wore expensive clothes and loved Lalique jewelry.
Unfortunately, Vivien was a tragic soul and her eccentricity lead to her death.
While visiting London in 1908, deeply despondent and ruinously in debt, she tried to kill herself by drinking an excess of laudanum. She stretched out on her divan with a bouquet of violets held over her heart. This attempt failed. She attempted suicide a total of three times.
She died in 1909 at age 32 from pneumonia due to alcoholism, drug abuse and anorexia nervosa. She weighed seventy pounds at her time of death.
I detest heavy perfume and shrill voices. - Renée Vivien


Reblogging for the info but I’m pretty sure the photo is NOT Renee. Read more about Renee Vivien at GLBTQ Encyclopedia

Renée  Vivien, who had many affairs with women, openly celebrated lesboerotic  love in her poetry and dreamed of women-controlled spaces in an era when  most women were still domestically confined.

edwardianera:

fabulousandeccentric:

Renée Vivien

Born Pauline Mary Tarn in Britain, Vivien moved to France at age 21 and changed her name.

Vivien lived lavishly and was openly lesbian. She traveled excessively all around the world, wintering in Egypt and spending time in China, the Middle East and America. Two of her well-known love affairs were with Natalie Clifford Barney and Baroness Hélène de Zuylen. Vivien was known to be beautiful and elegant before her illness. She wore expensive clothes and loved Lalique jewelry.

Unfortunately, Vivien was a tragic soul and her eccentricity lead to her death.

While visiting London in 1908, deeply despondent and ruinously in debt, she tried to kill herself by drinking an excess of laudanum. She stretched out on her divan with a bouquet of violets held over her heart. This attempt failed. She attempted suicide a total of three times.

She died in 1909 at age 32 from pneumonia due to alcoholism, drug abuse and anorexia nervosa. She weighed seventy pounds at her time of death.

I detest heavy perfume and shrill voices. - Renée Vivien

Reblogging for the info but I’m pretty sure the photo is NOT Renee. Read more about Renee Vivien at GLBTQ Encyclopedia

Renée Vivien, who had many affairs with women, openly celebrated lesboerotic love in her poetry and dreamed of women-controlled spaces in an era when most women were still domestically confined.

Filed under renee vivien natalie barney Baroness Hélène de Zuylen

2 notes &

The ever-intriguing dadaist Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Great post about her at Worn Through: Anarchists of Style

The Baronness is not a futurist. She is the future.

—Marcel Duchamp

[…]

Her Style: In her very public flaunting of her defiance of stereotypical female rolls, the Duchess is credited with some of the following ensembles:

“So she shaved her head. Next she lacquered it a high vermillion. Then she stole the crepe from the door of a house of morning and made a dress out of it,” recalls Margaret Anderson. Later, upon arriving at The Little Review offices, she took off the crepe. “I’m better when I’m nude, she said.” [5]

“A bride lost the heel of her left shoe at the tube station,” reported friend William Carlos Williams, “lost, it becomes a jewel, a ruby in La Baronne’s miscellany.” [6]

Painter George Biddle recalls the Baronness inquiring if he needed a model. “I told her I’d like to see her in the nude. With a royal gesture she swept apart the folds of a scarlet raincoat. She stood before me quite naked—or nearly so. Over the nipples of her breasts were two twin tomato cans, fastened with a green string about her back. Between the tomato cans hung a very small bird-cage and a crestfallen canary.” [7]

Image two’s source, Modernism: American Salons, has some great Djuna Barnes material. Elsa is of course mentioned along with Peggy Guggenheim, Thelma Wood, and Natalie Barney.

Filed under Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven Djuna Barnes Dada Duchamp Peggy Guggenheim Thelma Wood Natalie Barney Worn Through